Monday, June 15, 2015

Final Thoughts

Final Thoughts
I had lots of fun this semester in drawing and painting. It was one of  my favorite classes I have taken, due to the many memorable experiences. My first memorable experience, was comparing my pre-instructional self portrait to my final self portrait. There was a very big improvement. Because of this, I learned that there is always room for improvement, as nothing is perfect. My second memorable experience was when I stayed after school for 5 hours and to finish my still-life. It took a lot of work, and by the end of exhausted, but I learned something very important. Art requires time, patience, and hard work. My last memorable experience was the watercolor unit. I had a lot of fun and learned so much about the different watercolor techniques. Before this unit, I thought there was only one way to paint with watercolors, I didn't realize there were different techniques. Looking back at the year, I think that watercolor was definitely my favorite unit. I enjoyed just being able to go with the flow and paint whatever I wanted. It was a great year.

Work of art that I am most proud of

Work of art that I am most proud of

          Out of all the work I have done this year, I am the most proud of my imaginative self portrait. I definitely spent a lot of time on this piece, and it seems to have paid off. I learned many things while making this painting. First of all, I learned how to be creative and really think about who I am as a person. Most of the time I do artwork that does not require tons of creativity. This one was different, It really made me think, and I found it very challenging to come up with ideas on how to present it. Also, I learned how to use pen as a medium. Before, it was something I had never done. You use thicker lines and lines closer together to make it dark, and thin lines that are far apart to make it light. Lastly, I learned how to make my artwork balance between negative and positive space. This is one of the things I am most proud about in this piece of artwork. 

Watercolor Techniques

Watercolor Techniques

Purpose: to experiment and learn a variety of watercolor techniques


          During this unit, I learned many importance watercolor concepts. In class, we practiced all of the different techniques, but the one I used most was loaded brush. While experimenting, I liked this technique because it was very smooth, and gave the artwork a very clean look. Another technique I used quite often was wet in wet. While practicing, I learned that this technique worked very well for water and sky because it gives a sort of faded and watery look. Also, in my final project, I used many other techniques including stippling, whisking, dry brush, scraping and tip only. I learned that stippling looked very intricate and detailed and it was very fun to do. However, it takes much patience. I learned that whisking is a good technique for grass and trees. I actually used this for the trees in my final landscape painting. I learned that dry brush was helpful when you needed more texture in your painting. I also learned that scraping was a good technique for painting grass and adding detail to a piece of art. Lastly, I learned that tip only was a great way to make a watercolor painting more abstract. One of the most important things to remember when using watercolor is to plan out your painting first, as watercolor is not very forgiving. Also, it is important to have white in your paintings, so you must plan this out before by using tape, masking fluid, or just being conscious of it. Most importantly, I had a lot of fun in this unit and I learned so much. 

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Final Still-Life Painting

Final Still-Life Painting


Purpose:
  • To communicate all of your knowledge about color and painting techniques to create a final, more complex, still-life painting (than your smaller still-life studies);
  • To use your knowledge about composition and placement to arrange your fruit and/or vegetable to create a strong composition.


The first thing I mentioned in my still-life studies blogpost was that I wanted to remember to make the painting asymmetrical. I did this in some aspects of the painting. For example, the composition was not symmetrical, however I centered everything in the painting. The second thing I wanted to remember was to show that the objects were not floating in the air. I think I did a good job with this in my final still-life because the shadows make the objects look grounded. Also, differentiating between the three sides of the box contributed to making the objects look like they were not floating. Next, I wanted to remember to make the objects three dimensional. I did this in my final painting by using different shades of colors. Lastly, I wanted to remember to have contrast between the shadow and the background, which I did well in my final still-life.
My successes while working on this still life was my shadows and use of detail. As I mentioned before, I think I did a good job showing the contrast between the shadow and the background and my shadows are very accurate. I also like how I took the time to put a lot of detail into my work, especially on the shell. Some things I had trouble with during this project, were the starfish, the flowers, and making the small shells look realistic. The starfish was very difficult because of the texture, and I had trouble making the right color. the flowers were challenging because I had to make them really detailed. Lastly, the small shells were the hardest part because of the detail and the odd angles at which I was looking at them. Although there were many challenges while working on my still-life, I dealt with them by working hard, having patience, and coming in outside of class to work. 


Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Perspective Strategies

Perspective Strategies
Linear perspective is one of the two main elements of perspective drawing, "which deals with the organisation of shapes in a space."

Aerial Perspective is another one of the two main elements and it "deals with the atmospheric effects on tones and colours."

The Horizon line is "the axis around which a perspective drawing is constructed." In other words, it is the level that your eyes are at and it is a line in which everything leads towards.

The vanishing point is a single point on the horizon line that is directly in front of the viewers eyes.

Orthogonal lines are lines use in two point perspective that are drawn from each corner of a shape to each of the vanishing points.

Transversal lines are parallel to the picture plane and to one another, are right angles to the orthogonal lines, and establish distance between two orthogonal lines.







Friday, May 1, 2015

Still Life Studies

Still Life Studies

 


As I begin my final still life painting, there are many things that I want to keep in mind. First of all, I want to remember to not make the painting symmetrical. Some of the ways I can do this are by putting the subject of the painting off center. I also want to remember to show that the objects are not floating in the air. I will do this by showing that the objects are inside of a box and by showing the shadows. Most importantly, I want to work on making the objects in my painting three dimensional by using different shades of colors. Lastly, I want to remember to have contrast between the shadow and the background and the object in the background. This is done by using colors that really stand out next to each other.